Drinks with ‘Grapefruits, Pineapples, Rum, Schnapps, Zombie Glass

Moes Cock

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Great tasting!

Ingredients:

  • De Kuyper Sour Apple Pucker Schnapps
  • Cruzan Coconut Rum
  • Pineapple
  • Grapefruit

Preparation:

Pour 42 millilitres of the De Kuyper Sour Apple Pucker Schnapps
Pour 103 millilitres of the Cruzan Coconut Rum
Pour 0 millilitres of the Pineapple
Pour 0 millilitres of the Grapefruit

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Pink Lady

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pink lady is a classic gin-based cocktail with a long history. The egg-whites and cream mix creates a foam that floats on top of the drink and giving it a unique texture.

Due to its name, color, ingredients, and texture, the Pink Lady is traditionally a very feminine drink choice, colloquially known as a “girly drink.” Writer/bartender Jack Townsend speculated in his 1951 The Bartender’s Book that very non-threatening appearance of the Pink Lady may have appealed to women who did not have much experience with alcohol. Ironically, the Pink Lady is very dry by today’s standards, with its gin base and slight grenadine flavoring lacking the extreme fruit flavor or sweetness that modern drinkers associate with girly drinks.[2] The plain taste of the drink reinforces Townsend’s hypothesis that this drink achieved its feminine reputation by way of appealing to women with little experience in drinking.

This drink was traditionally made with Plymouth gin which has a stronger flavor of herbs compared to the standard gin.

Ingredients:

  • 4.5 cl (one part) Gin
  • 1 tsp. Grenadine
  • 1 tsp. cream
  • 1 egg white

Preparation:

Shake ingredients and strain into cocktail glass.

Ramos Gin Fizz

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A Ramos gin fizz (also known as a Ramos fizz or New Orleans fizz) contains gin, lemon juice, lime juice, egg white, sugar, cream, orange flower water, and soda water. It is served in a large glass, such as a Zombie glass (a non-tapered 12 to 14 ounce glass).
The orange flower water and egg white significantly affect the flavor and texture of a Ramos, compared to a regular Gin Fizz. As Cleveland bar chef Everest Curley points out “a big key to making egg cocktails is not to use ice at first; the sugar acts as an emulsifier, while it and the alcohol ‘cooks’ the egg white.”[3] Even so, many bartenders today use powdered egg white because of the possible health risks associated with consuming raw eggs.
Henry C. Ramos invented the Ramos gin fizz in 1888 at his bar in Meyer’s Restaurant in New Orleans, Louisiana. It was originally called the New Orleans Fizz, and is one of the city’s most famous cocktails. Before Prohibition, the bar employed dozens of “shaker boys” to create the drinks during periods of heavy business.
The Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans also popularized the drink, as did governor Huey Long’s fondness for it. In July 1935, Long brought a bartender named Sam Guarino from the Roosevelt Hotel to the New Yorker Hotel in New York City to show the staff there how to make the drink, so he could have it whenever he was there. The Museum of the American Cocktail has newsreel footage of this event. The Roosevelt Hotel group trademarked the drink name in 1935 and still makes it today.

348px-RamosGinFizzRooseveltNOLAJuly2009

Zombie Glass

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