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Ice Cubes

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Captain Morgan Tattoo

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La Belle Orange Cognac

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Rémy Martin Coeur de Cognac

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Hare Kremali Turk Kahveli Coffee Liqueur

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Sweet Red Vermouth Noily Prat

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Campari

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Campari is an alcoholic apéritif (20.5%, 21%, 25% or 28% ABV, depending on the country in which it is sold) obtained from the infusion of herbs and fruit (including chinotto) in alcohol and water. It is a bitters characterized by its dark red color.

Campari is often used in cocktails and is commonly served with soda water, wine, or citrus juice. It is produced by the Campari Group, a multi-national company based in Italy.

Cointreau

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Cointreau Distillery was set up in 1849 by Adolphe Cointreau, a confectioner, and his brother Edouard-Jean Cointreau from Angers. Their first success was with the cherry liqueur, guignolet, but it was when they concocted a blend of sweet and bitter orange peels and pure alcohol from sugar beets that the success of the enterprise was definitively confirmed. In 1875, the first bottles of Cointreau were sold. It is now estimated that thirteen million bottles are sold each year, in more than 150 countries. Ninety percent of production is exported. The company is still owned and run by the Cointreau family, although a notable descendant, André J. Cointreau, left the company to run the famed Paris-based Le Cordon Bleu culinary school in the 1990s.

The production methods and recipe are a family secret, but tours of the distillery are open to the public. Photography is restricted in many areas to protect the production process from being copied.

Cointreau sources its bitter oranges from all over the world, usually Spain, Brazil and Saint-Raphaël, Haiti as well as

Tomato

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The tomato is a savory, typically red, edible fruit, as well as the plant (Solanum lycopersicum) which bears it. Originating in South America, the tomato was spread around the world following the Spanish colonization of the Americas, and its many varieties are now widely grown, often in greenhouses in cooler climates.

The tomato fruit is consumed in diverse ways, including raw, as an ingredient in many dishes and sauces, and in drinks. While it is botanically a fruit, it is considered a vegetable for culinary purposes (as well as by the United States Supreme Court, see Nix v. Hedden), which has caused some confusion. The fruit is rich in lycopene, which may have beneficial health effects.

The tomato belongs to the nightshade family. The plants typically grow to 1–3 metres (3–10 ft) in height and have a weak stem that often sprawls over the ground and vines over other plants. It is a perennial in its native habitat, although often grown outdoors in temperate climates as an annual.

Passion Fruit

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Passiflora edulis is a vine species of passion flower that is native to Paraguay, Brazil and northen Argentina(Corrientes and Misiones provinces, among others).[1] Common names include Passion Fruit (UK and US),Passionfruit (Australia and New Zealand), Granadilla (South America and South Africa), Pasiflora (Israel), Parchita(Venezuela), Maracujá (Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Paraguay), Maracuyá (Peru, Colombia, Panama), Chinola (Dominican Republic), Lilikoi (Hawaiian), Magrandera Shona (Zimbabwe), Markisa (Indonesian), and Lạc tiênChanh dây orChanh leo (Vietnamese). It is cultivated commercially in frost-free areas for its fruit and is widely grown in India, Sri Lanka, New Zealand, the Caribbean, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Indonesia, Peru, California, Florida, Haiti, Hawaii,Argentina, Australia, East Africa, Mexico, Israel, Costa Rica, South Africa and Portugal (Azores and Madeira). The passion fruit is round to oval, either yellow or dark purple at maturity, with a soft to firm, juicy interior filled with numerous seeds. The fruit can be grown to be eaten or for its juice, which is often added to other fruit juices to enhance the aroma. The fruit shown are mature for juicing and culinary use. For eating right out of the fruit, the fruit should be allowed to wrinkle for a few days to raise the sugar levels and enhance the flavor.

The two types of passion fruit have clearly differing exterior appearances. The bright yellow variety of passion fruit, which is also known as the Golden Passion Fruit, can grow up to the size of a grapefruit, has a smooth, glossy, light and airy rind, and has been used as a rootstock for the Purple Passion Fruit in Australia.[2] The dark purple passion fruit is smaller than a lemon, though it is less acidic than the yellow passion fruit, and has a richer aroma and flavor.[3]In Colombia, the purple passion fruit is referred to as “gulupa”, to distinguish it from the yellow maracuyá

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